Published: Tue, September 12, 2017
Life&Culture | By Rose Hansen

Peta Settles After Suing Photographer Over Monkey Selfie

Peta Settles After Suing Photographer Over Monkey Selfie

The case was listed as "Naruto v David Slater" but the identity of the monkey had also been in dispute, with Peta claiming it is a female called Naruto and Mr Slater saying it is a different male macaque.

Jeff Kerr, general counsel at PETA, said: "PETA's groundbreaking case sparked a massive global discussion about the need to extend fundamental rights to animals for their own sake, not in relation to how they can be exploited by humans".

Under the agreement, Slater will donate 25% of any future revenue derived from using or selling the monkey selfie to charities that protect the crested macaques' habitat in Indonesia, according to a joint statement published on PETA's website.

The understanding conveys to a conclusion to a debate which began in 2011 when Mr Slater went to Sulawesi, Indonesia, and spent seven days taking pictures of macaques.

But after a 2 year fight, USA appeal judges have ruled against Peta and in favour of Mr Slater.

Cleanup begins as Irma moves out of Florida
Still a large hurricane, its tropical storm force winds extend out 415 miles, despite weakening a bit more to 100 mph. Insurance index gained 1.5 per cent ahead of the 0.8-per-cent gain for the overall S&P 500.

At one point he mounted the camera on a tripod and one of the monkeys started pressing the shutter button.

They refused and said that the copyright was with the monkey.

Slater earned just a few thousand pounds from the pictures and said he was considering giving up photography and becoming a tennis coach in order to earn money.

Lawyers for the camera's owner, nature photographer David Slater, argued that his company, Wildlife Personalities Ltd., owns worldwide commercial rights to the photos, including a now-famous selfie of the monkey's toothy grin.

"Naruto has the right to own and benefit from the copyright.in the same manner and to the same extent as any other author", they said in their lawsuit at the time.

Like this: