Published: Sun, January 14, 2018
Sci-tech | By Carrie Guzman

Supermassive black hole emits a ferocious 'double burp'.

Supermassive black hole emits a ferocious 'double burp'.

Astronomers have caught a massive black hole letting out a "double burp" after bingeing on hot gas. While astronomers have predicted such objects can flicker on and off as a result of gas feeding events, this is one of the few times one has been caught in the act.

"Black holes are voracious eaters, but it turns out they don't have very good table manners", Julie Comerford, from the University of Colorado, Boulder, told the 231st American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington DC.

Comerford said, "We are seeing this object feast, burp and nap, and then feast and burp once again, which theory had predicted". "Our galaxy's supermassive black hole is now napping after a big meal, just like J1354's black hole has in the past".

"Fortunately, we happened to observe [J1354] at a time when we could clearly see evidence for both events", Comerford added in the statement.

Hubble was able to show them that a cloud of blue-green gas extending away from the black hole represented the aftermath of an earlier burp.

The galaxy under study, known to the researchers as J1354, is about 900 million light-years from Earth.

The team used observations from two space telescopes-the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory-as well as the W.M. Keck Observatory in Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and the Apache Point Observatory near Sunspot, New Mexico.

Mourinho appears to confirm Manchester United interest in signing Sanchez
French side Paris St-Germain have also been linked with Chile forward but Sanchez's preference is to join Manchester City . The Bordeaux midfielder is wanted by a host of clubs including the North London duo and Manchester United .

Other co-authors on the new study include postdoctoral fellow Francisco Muller-Sanchez of CU Boulder, Jenny Greene of Princeton University, David Pooley from Trinity University, Daniel Stern from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and Fiona Harrison from the California Institute of Technology.

Now, the Hubble and Chandra space telescopes have detected a new belch emerging from a black hole located about 800 million light-years away. The scientists first tried to pinpoint the exact location of the super massive blackhole using the Chandra telescope that observed the X-ray emissions coming out of the distant galaxy dubbed SDSS J1354+1327. "That collision led gas to stream towards the supermassive black hole and feed it two separate meals that led to these two separate burps".

Meanwhile, another burp must have taken place much more recently, having had less time to fan our across the stars. The X-ray data also provide evidence that the supermassive black hole is embedded in a heavy veil of dust and gas.

Even our Milky Way galaxy has had at least one burp, said Comerford. Now that researchers have discovered those belches, it helps them determine the pace of those processes.

This energy is released in quasars which erupt right across the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves through to visible light and X-ray wavelengths.

The observations are important because they support previous theories - not demonstrated until now - that black holes should go through these cycles.

Like this: