Published: Tue, August 07, 2018
Sport | By Gary Shelton

Group rallies in support of OSU football, Urban Meyer

Group rallies in support of OSU football, Urban Meyer

I SUPPORT: "URBAN MEYER & THE BUCKS O-H-I-O" and one that stated, "INNOCENT 'TIL PROVEN GUILTY ESPN GUILTY OF ABUSE!" with "PROVEN" underlined.

Ohio State said in a release that a trustees' committee formed to coordinate the investigation had an initial meeting and has hired a firm to conduct the probe of Meyer, who says he followed proper protocol when informed of a 2015 abuse allegation against assistant Zach Smith.

"Ohio State is committed to a thorough and complete investigation", Davidson said in a statement.

In those remarks, he claimed there was "nothing" to a report that police had twice been called to the home of former assistant Zach Smith in 2015 to respond to allegations by his then-wife, Courtney, of domestic abuse and menace by stalking. This, despite the fact that the Ohio State coach denied knowing anything about it at Big Ten Media Days last week.

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"When we're talking about arrogance, that seems to go hand in hand with Urban Meyer", Finebaum said on "First Take" last week.

The investigation itself is being led by former Chair of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Mary Jo White.

Meyer's knowledge of the incidents came into question after college football insider Brett McMurphy reported that Smith had told Meyer's wife Shelley about the 2015 incidents and shared pictures of the injuries and text messages that she shared with McMurphy. No charges were filed, though Smith was arrested at the time. Meyer later admitted he'd been untruthful when asked about the alleged incidents. He said he discussed the 2015 allegations at the time with Meyer and athletic director Gene Smith. They chanted his name, they pushed their signs into the sky, and they passionately defended the head coach who has made Ohio State one of the top three college football powerhouses in the country.

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